Four Deaths in Niger and the Savage Logic of Military Operations

*Note: This essay was originally published on the Modern War Institute’s Commentary & Analysis site. It can also be found online here

The furor over the recent loss of four Army Special Forces soldiers’ raises the grandest question of them all: Why?

To answer, we have to peek through the fog that often clouds military operations—to reveal an uncomfortable truth.

Two rigid, bloody axioms govern the logic of military operations: time is often more valuable than human life, and the good of the many nearly always matters more than the few. Continue reading “Four Deaths in Niger and the Savage Logic of Military Operations”

Who Should We Save? On Perilous Judgments and Military Moral Thought

*Note: This essay was originally published on the Modern War Institute’s Commentary & Analysis site.

Who should we save?

That’s the question a Johns Hopkins doctor has been asking, and who was recently profiled in a thought provoking New York Times article. More specifically, “When a surge of patients – from a disaster, disease outbreak, or terrorist attack – overwhelms hospitals, how should you ration care? Whose lives should be saved first?” Continue reading “Who Should We Save? On Perilous Judgments and Military Moral Thought”