What the Profession of Arms Can Take from Michael Flynn’s Example

*Note: This essay was originally published on the Modern War Institute’s Commentary & Analysis site.

I would never actively cheer an administrational death, but, paraphrasing Clarence Darrow, I did smile a bit while reading Michael Flynn’s resignation in the newspaper. It wasn’t for any personal ill will or partisan reason (my stance on political neutrality is well documented), but my grin formed because Flynn’s actions in retirement have directly contradicted two pillars of the Profession of Arms—its apolitical tradition and truth-telling character. And the end of his short tenure as national security advisor provides the Profession a ponderous moment to reflect on what Flynn hath wrought. Continue reading “What the Profession of Arms Can Take from Michael Flynn’s Example”

Who Should We Save? On Perilous Judgments and Military Moral Thought

*Note: This essay was originally published on the Modern War Institute’s Commentary & Analysis site.

Who should we save?

That’s the question a Johns Hopkins doctor has been asking, and who was recently profiled in a thought provoking New York Times article. More specifically, “When a surge of patients – from a disaster, disease outbreak, or terrorist attack – overwhelms hospitals, how should you ration care? Whose lives should be saved first?” Continue reading “Who Should We Save? On Perilous Judgments and Military Moral Thought”